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The Pro’s Process - Larry Tentarelli

I am very excited to be able to offer the twentieth in my series of posts asking Pro Traders about their psychological processes.  Delving a little into how it feels to them when trading.  The good and the bad.  How this has changed over time and what preparation they do mentally for performing as a trader.

One of the key features for me was that I wanted traders with experience who have been through the mill over the years and of course those who were kind enough to broach this subject publicly.  This I hope gives developing traders more to learn from.  

I’m very fortunate to have a great line up and this week is: 

Trader: Larry Tentarelli

1) How long have you been trading?

For 16 years, starting in 1998. I was also a broker with Merrill Lynch from 1999 through 2003.

2) What style of trading / investing do you practice (technically driven, fundamental, systematic, a combination etc)?

I follow a systematic, price-based Trend Following process. It is technically driven to the degree that price dictates the programs, but I do not trade off traditional Technical Analysis of chart patters or other indicators. I follow fairly simple Moving Average and Breakout based programs. I spent a considerable amount of time researching, testing and developing programs that were conducive to my personality. Over time, I have simplified the programs and achieved better returns from the simplification.
I only trade price and MAs though. I do not combine it with any other methods of trading.

3) How do you feel when a trade goes against you?

I have very little emotional involvement with my losing trades. I know that my style of trading will always having losers, but a very good expectancy. I keep emotions in check, because I manage the losers to get cut quickly when they start working against me. I know that my when I am wrong in a trade, price will stop me out, the loss will be contained and move on. Losers literally are a cost of doing business and unavoidable. Managing the damage is the key. My style of trading Is to take small losers and hold for big winners. 

4) How do you feel when a trade goes for you?

Following a quant driven process, Is easy to say “no emotions”, but like everyone else, I like winners too. I get very detached from my losers quickly, but I like the Home Run Ball just as much as the next guy.  Not only is it financially rewarding, but is a nice confirmation of the programs in Real Time. When I get into a trade, I know that any one can turn into a big winner if momentum kicks in. 

5) How have these feelings changed over your trading career?  (Can you recall how you originally used to feel and elaborate on how this has changed over time?)

I turned to a quantitative process because I was a very poor discretionary trader. For years I committed many of the basic mistakes - overtrading, emotional trading, trading off the news or “feel”. I went through two trading stakes, and backed away from trading 2 or 3 times along the way. Early on, I would personalize my trades in an effort to try to confirm myself as a successful trader. It did not work well for me. Now I am on the other side of the fence, where I just accept that the future is unknowable and that all known data is reflected in the current price on the screen. I read long ago that the weakest link in any trading system is the trader himself. I definitely did fit that bill before I started following price.

6) Do you have any practices that you do away from the trading screen to help you mentally and emotionally handle trading?

Spending time with my two young children evens me out. Also exercise and classical music. Fortunately for me, I don’t trade very frequently per se, because my programs suit my personality, which is longer term in nature. Most of my trading is automated to a degree, where entries and exits are pre set, i.e. buy/sell stops tor breakouts or trailing stops/stop losses. If stops get hit, the order is executed and I move on.
Since I follow a few basic programs, I don’t get intra-day stress. If I am trading say a 200 day Breakout program or a 40 week MA break, I don’t need to look at the screen all day. I do not day or swing trade at all, and fortunately I make zero discretionary trades anymore. I put a lot of time into testing and developing my programs, so I don’t have to monitor the markets all day. I also exercise regularly, get deep tissue massages, and listen to classical or relaxing music to decompress.

7) Have you always done this?

NO. I used to spend all night reading news reports, and analyst opinions and getting mentally and emotionally whipsawed.

8) If not, how have you learnt to deal with the feelings that come up when trading?

The best way that I deal with feelings is to automate the process, and remove myself from the equation. If I get into a protracted drawdown, I reduce trading size until it stabilizes, or my positions start working again. I have read different approaches to handling drawdowns or stress, and there is no one size fits all. Many like to trade bigger to get back on track, but I focus on protecting my downside by losing less when I am in a bad streak, especially at major trend reversals.

9) Can you describe a time in your trading life which really rammed home the point that so much of trading comes down to psychological factors?

Yes. When I gave up trading due to frustration and losses. I realized the markets didn’t beat me, I beat myself. The classic Jesse Livermore line. I firmly believe that most if not all of trading over a longer time frame is psychological. Many don’t trade to make money. Many trade for other emotional reasons, which is not usually productive.
Once I fully accepted that I, nor anyone else, is able to consistently and profitably predict anything, and I turned it over to just trading price, my results improved drastically and my outlook was much, much better. I know that I really don’t know anything, but that puts me a step ahead of those who haven’t learned this yet. Based on my acceptance of not knowing, I freely follow price and have no bias. Today I was flipped from long to short in GDX and it meant as much to me as reading a can of soup. Nothing.

10) If you could give aspiring traders one piece of advice about emotionally handling the market what would it be?

I firmly believe the absolute best advice is to under-trade in every aspect. Trade smaller - smaller positions, less open positions, less frequently, etc. Trading can be very emotional and stressful for a number of reasons - the amount of available data and constant news flow, real money on the line, the need to feel like one has to constantly do something.
Most new traders want to get rich overnight, but the stats prove that one is much more likely to go broke quickly. Cut everything in half. Half the risk, positions, size, frequency all of it. We all pay the price of learning how to trade, for me it took years. I learned from Dr. Alexander Elder’s work that he goal of all new traders should be to just survive at first. It is very good advice. Pro’s trade first not to lose big, and then to make money. New traders get the roles reversed, which doesn’t compute. Protect the downside and let the upside take care of itself.

***

I’d like to thank Larry Tentarelli for sharing about the way he tackles the market from an emotional / mental side of things and for his willingness to allow me to post this as a free resource in the hope that traders who have been in the market for less time or are thinking of entering can perhaps pick up some A-HA’s.

If you are interested in finding more out about Larry Tentarelli you can find him:

Twitter: @systemstrader95 

***

Previously in the series:

Charles Kirk - read it…..here

Matt Davio - read it…..here

David Blair - read it….here

Mike Bellafiore - read it….here

Mark Holstead - read it ….here

Brian Shannon - read it…. here

Mike Dever - read it…. here

Anthony Crudele - read it… here 

Derek Hernquist - read it … here

Ivan Hoff - read it… here

Brian Lund - read it… here

Greg Harmon - read it… here

Michael Bigger - read it… here

Jon Boorman - read it…. here

Darrin Donnelly - read it….. here

Stephen Burns - read it…. here

Tony Rohrs - read it…. here

Bruce Bower - read it…. here

Richard Weissman - read it… here

***

[If you liked this please follow me on twitter and Google Plus

***

Disclaimer: Embrace The Trend / Richard Chignell does not provide investment, financial or product advice.  If you are going to trade / invest it’s at your own risk and you must take responsibility for your actions.

Embrace The Trend turned 3 today!

Embrace The Trend turned 3 today!

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The Person That Does Not Lose Can Only Win

In an interview with Ryron Gracie, before a fight, he said something I think is very relevant to traders:

"If my Grandfather were here he would say Ryron when you get in a fight the person that does not lose can only win.  The first goal is not to lose.”  

This is RELEVANT to traders.

It’s not relevant for those that interpret this in terms of never having losing trades.  If you are still in that place there is a long road in front of you.  

But, for people that are further down the road, what this speaks to is the importance of defense and risk management.  

First you have to make sure you don’t lose all your capital.  If you can protect that you are still in the game and like Ryron’s Grandfather Helio said you can only win.  This based on the premise that you have a long enough time horizon and actually have an edge.

Your winners must cover your losers.  An easy way to do that is to focus on keeping the losers small.  

He goes on to say that he “needs to go out there and see if I can defend myself against him, can I survive against him.”

This is where the risk management and discipline comes in.  With the market you need to have the same focus on defense and survival.  At its core this is the most important factor in trading.

All the best traders have excellent defense.  

If you don’t have defense, if you don’t focus on surviving you are dead before you even begin.

You have to put yourself in that position where like in the opening paragraph you go on to win but that only comes through superior defense.

Don’t believe me?  

Re-read the Market Wizards or Reminiscenses and see how many times the best in the business say the worst thing that happened to them was being lucky at the start.  They didn’t realise it was luck as they hadn’t paid their dues yet.  Sure enough the market will take its tuition and it does so in a heavy handed smack down more often than not.  

This normally kills off most people and they are carried out on a stretcher never to be seen again.  

Those that aren’t learn the importance of denfense and surviving.

Some of the best trading lessons come away from the screens.

Lesson No 1, the big kahuna of them all; 

PLAY EXCELLENT DEFENSE

The Pro’s Process - Richard Weissman

I am very excited to be able to offer the nineteenth in my series of posts asking Pro Traders about their psychological processes.  Delving a little into how it feels to them when trading.  The good and the bad.  How this has changed over time and what preparation they do mentally for performing as a trader.

One of the key features for me was that I wanted traders with experience who have been through the mill over the years and of course those who were kind enough to broach this subject publicly.  This I hope gives developing traders more to learn from.  

I’m very fortunate to have a great line up and this week is: 

Trader: Richard Weissman

1) How long have you been trading?

Since 1987

2) What style of trading / investing do you practice (technically driven, fundamental, systematic, a combination etc)?

Primarily my models are technically-driven though depending on the fundamentals I might accept slightly larger percentage exposures of total assets under management - specifically, if the market rallies on bad news or sells off on good news I will take on slightly larger exposures in the direction of the market movement.

3) How do you feel when a trade goes against you?

One of the great myths of trading is that once you are successful you will no longer feel any emotions during drawdowns.  This is absolute nonsense.  Instead, I have learned to dampen the emotionalism associated with drawdowns and to prevent such emotions from derailing my adherence to the positive expectancy models as well as stringent rules of risk management.

4) How do you feel when a trade goes for you?

Same as above.
5) How have these feelings changed over your trading career?  (Can you recall how you originally used to feel and elaborate on how this has changed over time?)
Earlier in my career my emotions would result in abandonment of positive expectancy models as well as my adherence to rules of risk management.

6) Do you have any practices that you do away from the trading screen to help you mentally and emotionally handle trading?

Yes, I do lots of affirmations (example: I am adhering to a positive expectancy model and prudent rules of risk management, therefore I have confidence in taking each and every trading signal), modelling of my behavior based on traders I respect (example: I ask myself is this how Larry Hite would manage the risk on this trade?); a wide array of somatic exercises (including yoga, swimming, walking, deepening of breath, aerobics) and meditation.

7) Have you always done this?

No.  I developed these techniques in order to make it easier to follow my trading rules.   

8) If not, how have you learnt to deal with the feelings that come up when trading?

n/a

9) Can you describe a time in your trading life which really rammed home the point that so much of trading comes down to psychological factors?

I was experiencing a drawdown and abandoned a positive expectancy trading model.  I abandoned it because I realized that despite its enjoyment of positive expectancy it was actually not suited to my particular trading personality.  This led to the realization that we are not looking for the best risk-adjusted rate of return; that instead we are looking for the best risk-adjusted rate of return for our particular trading personalities.

10) If you could give aspiring traders one piece of advice about emotionally handling the market what would it be?

Backtest any and all trading strategies prior to putting capital at risk.  This will give you confidence during drawdowns.  Also, it is more important to be the best risk manager and best position manager than it is to develop the most robust rules for trade entry.
***

I’d like to thank Richard Weissman for sharing about the way he tackles the market from an emotional / mental side of things and for his willingness to allow me to post this as a free resource in the hope that traders who have been in the market for less time or are thinking of entering can perhaps pick up some A-HA’s.

If you are interested in finding more out about Richard Weissman you can find him:

Twitter: @TradeLikeCasino

Website: http://www.weissmansignals.com/

***

Previously in the series:

Charles Kirk - read it…..here

Matt Davio - read it…..here

David Blair - read it….here

Mike Bellafiore - read it….here

Mark Holstead - read it ….here

Brian Shannon - read it…. here

Mike Dever - read it…. here

Anthony Crudele - read it… here 

Derek Hernquist - read it … here

Ivan Hoff - read it… here

Brian Lund - read it… here

Greg Harmon - read it… here

Michael Bigger - read it… here

Jon Boorman - read it…. here

Darrin Donnelly - read it….. here

Stephen Burns - read it…. here

Tony Rohrs - read it…. here

Bruce Bower - read it…. here

***

[If you liked this please follow me on twitter and Google Plus

***

Disclaimer: Embrace The Trend / Richard Chignell does not provide investment, financial or product advice.  If you are going to trade / invest it’s at your own risk and you must take responsibility for your actions.

How right do you have to be to be world class? // Mini Blog(+)

Steve Cohen is aware of the psychological demands of trading.  He hired Dr Ari Kiev, the psychiatrist to work with his traders at SAC Capital.  Dr Kiev specialized in helping traders deal with stress, uncertainty and increasing performance.

In order to help traders with stress he would remind them that:

The best traders are correct only 60% of the time at best.

In his own words:

"So if you lose on four trades out of 10, you are still performing with the best of the best."

I like to think in the picture he is pointing at you to either (a) emphasize your need to learn this point, or (b) remind you of its importance.

I think it is wise to listen to the man. 

Practicing Discipline Makes You More Disciplined: A Personal Account

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**Originally shared on Google+ with all the other great stuff -> please visit my page and have a look —> https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RichardChignell1/posts **

I’m both a trader and a martial artist. These two aspects of my life don’t seem to be too common. For example I’ve only ever met one martial artist who trades or a trader who practices martial arts (yet).

One of the personal discoveries I’ve had since I got back into martial arts is the discipline required.

This discipline is required to get anywhere.

What I found is that it builds. It’s similar to how a muscle grows as you lift weights.

I started attending the training academy every morning. Which was a big step at the time as I’d allowed myself to get way out of shape. Everything hurt, everyone was better, I was embarrassed by my movement and how hard everything felt.

I dug in and kept going back.

I then decided to focus my training. Really dig into the basics.

It seemed boring, slow, it hurt even more despite the fact my body condition was improving.

I dug in and kept going back and what I noticed was that as I practiced being disciplined I got better at being disciplined.

When I didn’t feel like it, where in the past I would have dropped out, now I was able to overcome that feeling and show up. I started to feel particularly proud of myself on those days where my commitment to discipline overruled the old me who would have thrown in the towel at the smallest signal of discomfort.

I’ve tested this new found skill of discipline a lot more in my martial art training:

Adding a strength and conditioning component
Increasing my training hours
Increasing my focus during training
Increasing my training days from 5 to 6 days a week

I’ve also noticed how this carried over to other areas of life which is why I was pleased to read self-control expert and author of Willpower, Roy Baumeister, saysexerting discipline increases discipline:

"People have said for centuries that you can build character by making yourself do things you don’t want to do, that by exerting self-discipline you can make yourself into a stronger person. That does appear to be correct."

In some ways this quote isn’t completely accurate for me. I did want to do my martial arts training and had committed to the reality that it was a lifetime journey not some instant gratification pursuit. (I’m a strong proponent of delayed gratification but that is perhaps for another post).

What I do like is that Baumeister found in his study of Willpower that my direct experience was not unique to me (I wrote about The Importance Of Direct Experience here:https://plus.google.com/115249584757055670974/posts/fRbJhDiVPKU). In fact anyone practicing discipline can build their discipline ‘muscle’ and make themselves into a stronger person.

I wonder if you can think of ways that your life would improve if you were more disciplined?

How worthwhile would it be to practice or train your discipline?

I’ve found carryover from my work on discipline in the context of martial arts to my trading, diet, finances, relationships and more.

Let me know your answers to the above questions and if you’ve had a similar experience what it was. I’d really like to know.

Also please remember that just little acts of discipline have a compounding effect. You can start small.There is nothing holding you back.

#discipline   #practice   #performance   #training    #blog  

The Importance Of Direct Experience In Trading: with a learning detour through BJJ and Tao

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**Originally shared on Google+ with all the other great stuff -> please visit my page and have a look —> https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RichardChignell1/posts **

I’ve recently been investigating Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. It is sometimes referred to as art suave or in other words the soft art.

This ties in with my Chinese Internal Martial Art training as one of the key attributes with them is the ‘soft’ approach.

Now, when looking into Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) it doesn’t take long to hear about the Gracie family. They are essentially the Royal family of martial arts.

One of the most famous proponents of the art is Rickson Gracie (a simple Google of Gracie Jiu Jitsu will bring you hours of excellent reading and I’ll keep to the point here rather than rehash what is already out there).

Rickson other than being an amazing fighter, a proponent of BJJ and healthy living is known as somewhat of a philosopher.

Now I’m always going to be a fan of people who draw insight from martial art practice that transcends the training hall to the real world. I find many of my deepest reflections come from the blend of physical, emotional and mental development  that I get from my martial arts training.

In an interview with his talented daughter Kauan Gracie who is a dancer (full interview herehttp://bit.ly/1bpbhCG) she says:

"My dad is also a big philosopher. He likes to have long moral talks, which have helped me to learn many things in my life. But as much as he talked, he has always believed that the most valuable learning is done in our own skin, so he constantly gave me plenty of chances to try and succeed, but sometimes fail and learn for myself."

This point about the most valuable learning being done in our own skin draws parallels to wisdom I found in my Taoist studies.

Deng Ming Dao writes in Scholar Warrior that if a person wishes to know Tao directly that “There  is no need for organized religion, orthodoxy, scripture, or social conformity. There is only the need for direct experience.”

He also writes:

"you need only accept things only after you understand them and prove them in your own life. It is experience, not book learning or scripture, that is the best teacher. That is why it is said that the path of the Scholar Warrior is one of self-cultivation. Concepts accepted through religion, books, hearsay, or from any other person will always be weak. But skill and wisdom gained through self-cultivation can never be shaken.”

The traders reading this will know what I’m referring to here. For all the studying, research, reading courses etc there is zero substitute for the direct experience of trading.

No this does not include paper trading*. Here I’m referring to direct experience trading your own approach with what Taleb would refer to as ‘skin in the game’. This is where the real learning comes.
The learning / experience that over time ‘can never be shaken’ as Deng Ming Dao says.

Yet,  it is important to note that as Kauan Gracie says you need lots of opportunities to try and succeed, but sometimes you need to fail and learn for yourself.

In the Trading domain there will be many failures. No matter how you feel about this or what snake oil salesmen tell you it can’t be any other way.

Mentors, coaches and teachers can introduce you to the game and offer perhaps some short cuts in your learning development but it is only through direct experience that you will become the best trader you can be (or for that matter anything).

If you don’t believe me re-read any of the books in my 12 Most Utilised Trading Bookshttp://bit.ly/1bUSBpc with this post in mind and see from these masters of their art how it was their direct experiential learning that made them masters of their trading edge.

___
*1 I’m not fully against paper trading. It’s great for learning new platforms how to execute on them, test out ideas but IT IS NOT THE SAME AS TRADING WITH YOUR CAPITAL ON THE LINE! Yes, you’re right that the caps lock suggests I’m animated on this subject and you’d be right. My position is skin in the game or you have no voice. Period.
_____

#blog  


My 12 Most Utilised Trading Books

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….  the ones I’ve read and continue to read multiple times.

**Originally shared on Google+ with all the other great stuff -> please visit my page and have a look —> https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RichardChignell1/posts **

#commodities #futures #trading 

I am regularly asked what my favourite trading books are and why so here are some winners: 

► Edwin Lefevre
Reminiscences Of A Stock Operator
This is the classic trading book with so much market wisdom.  I read this at least twice a year. 

▷ Jack Schwager
Market Wizards
The New Market Wizards
Much like above.  Jack’s books are regular reads and have inspired many a trader.  I am one of them. 

► Victor Sperandeo
Trader Vic - Methods Of A Wall Street  Master
Trader Vic II - Principles Of Professional Speculation
If you just needed two books on trading I would probably point you to these.  

▷ Stanley Kroll 
The Professional Commodity Trader
Kroll On Futures Trading Strategy
These are somewhat less recognised than others on my list but they shouldn’t be.  Kroll’s books have a wealth of trading information from someone who was clearly in the trenches.  They read like a more modern day Reminiscences.

► Jim Rogers
Hot Commodities
Street Smarts
Jim was the first place I turned to learn about the commodity markets and is one of the few investors I listen to. 

▷ Michael Martin
The Inner Voice Of Trading
Mike has helped me so much with the psychological side of the market.  This is a brilliant book.

► Ed Seykota
The Trading Tribe Book
Ed is the man when it comes to having helped so many traders develop ‘right livelihood’, go with the flow and be in the ever present moment of now.  If you like the sound of that then this is a good place to turn.  Remember intentions = results.  

▷ Michael Covel
Trend Following
I was very lucky that this was the first book I read when I decided to look into trading and it set me off on the right track allowing me to avoid going down many of the rabbit holes others have to experience.

(Note: these are not in any particular order)

Why the picture of coffee berries? Simply because I predict a lot of people are about to start being ‘experts’ on coffee.

Photo credit: Stanislaw Szydlo 

Tell me in the comments what your most read trading related books are? 

#blog  

You Wouldn’t Think Freediving Had Anything To Teach Traders. You’d Be Wrong!

**Originally shared on Google+ with all the other great stuff -> please visit my page and have a look —> https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RichardChignell1/posts **

I recently enjoyed finding an article written by Tara Stiles on Freediving. That’s right the somewhat crazy pursuit of diving as deep down as you can on one single breath.

She holds her breath for over 5 minutes and dives down over 100 metres!! 

What’s more is that Tara went from total beginner to three-time world record holder in 9 months.

This on it’s own is interesting but it is the relevance of some of thepoints she made that relate to trading mastery that really resonated with me.

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Photo credit: Michael Pitts

Spoiler alert: If you think being a world record holder would be nice and that this sounds pretty easy as it only took Tara 9 months…. forget it she was an experienced yogi before she came to the sport.  

As you know yogis other than being extra bendy are masters of breath control. 

This highly qualified lady, no surprises, is now one of the top freediving coaches out there. 

In yoga in her own words “we start to hear about detatchment, letting go and being in the flow of life”. 

She talks about how freediving is the “perfect mirror because it doesn’t lie.  It doesn’t give us half-truths to soften the blow or protect our feelings; freediving shows us WHAT IS.”  

I think traders reading this will be able to relate to how this is much like how the market is to us.  It doesn’t care who you are or where you come from.  It doesn’t pull any punches.  It is a great leveller where there is zero favouritism. 

What is more sharing a commonality with an extreme pursuit like freediving, #trading forces you to experience feelings, it amplifies them and brings even well hidden ones right up to the surface in a most unavoidable manner. 

Tara goes on to say: 

"What enables me to dive deep is not my intellect, my ego, my ability to control and direct life with pinpoint precision… My desire to achieve or set another world record will not bring me closer to my goal.  The only thing that can allow me to dive deeper and more safely is trust and surrendering."

As a trader I relate to this by thinking how once I have entered a trade I have no control. No matter my intellectual understanding, opinion, hopes, amount of effort in my mind to bend the market to my will, desire to be wildly profitable…. it doesn’t matter a jot. 

The only thing I can do as a trader is trust and surrender.  In this case it is trust and surrender to my process, my trade plan and my protective stops. 

The concluding paragraph contains this nugget of wisdom to traders "where I let go of all expectation, relax my body and my mind, surrender to the process of the dive, accept each moment as it unfolds and trust that all is exactly as it needs to be in each moment"

Traders would be mindful to consider the relevance of this frame of mind to their optimal chance of riding a market move for the bulk of its duration. Learning to relax, surrender, trust in your process and live in the now are key attributes that are found in the real market wizards out there. 

► Please let me know your thoughts in the comments below.  I can think of several famous traders in the Market Wizards books who talk about similar things, can you? If so name them below.  There was also a recent trading book that talked of surrender as integral to a traders approach.  Do you know which one? 

Original arcicle: http://bit.ly/1hBKeWL Photo credit: Michael Pitts

#blog  

New Real Estate Experiment For Richard Chignell @embracethetrend

I’ve decided to experiment with Google+ for my writing in 2014.

It seems an ideal format for me as I can write about what interests, inspires, motivates me… and be broader in what I put out there.

I can also bang out shorter posts (micro-blogging) somewhere beyond twitters 150 characters and the fuller length blog posts. This I hope will encourage me to write more and perhaps be more enjoyable to those who like to follow me. So please go ahead and Circle Me! +RichardChignell

I will continue to cross post trading related material here (especially any future interviews in The Pro’s Process series) and I’ll update on twitter but if you want more of me find me over at Google+.

One of the most important things for me is to try and live as richer life as possible and this is far from just in the monetary sense. I’d like to write about some of the other areas that I am knowledgeable about, have some expertise in, am interested in and that add to the richness of life. So I expect to turn out more content on my Google+ page.

Anyway… there you have it.

For some of the rational for this move and to learn more about the areas that excite, stimulate, tickle, and otherwise motivate me pop on over to Google+

If you have come from this blog please message me and let me know… I’d like that :-).

Thanks,

+RichardChignell